Archive for the ‘ Take Action! ’ Category

Thursdays in Black: Reading for Life (Part II)

Thursdays in Black official logo

Why Wear Black?

It’s perfectly simple: for one day a week, wear black to show your support for survivors of discrimination and violence, and to work together for a world without brutality. In addition, I have decided to add a weekly feature to this blog, in which I will feature a specific Human Rights-related link, article, blog post or other media item and discussion, encouraging others to get involved. Read my first post here.

Link(s) of the Day:

Pro-Literacy.org
Literacy.org
Books Open the World

Why I Chose These Links:

This month’s Social Justice theme is Literacy and Education. As a lifelong reader and a postgraduate student, these are subjects that are very close to my heart. I can’t imagine not being able to read or write, to not be able to enjoy the blissful feeling of sinking into another world through literature or the joy of expanding my understanding of the world through knowledge. In addition, illiteracy and lack of education are some of the leading contributors to poor economic growth and poverty. Today’s links are international organisations dedicated to helping adult learners improve their literacy all over the world. Check them out and see what you can do to help!

Thursdays in Black: The Worst Form of Violence (Part IV)

Thursdays in Black official logo

Why Wear Black?

It’s perfectly simple: for one day a week, wear black to show your support for survivors of discrimination and violence, and to work together for a world without brutality. In addition, I have decided to add a weekly feature to this blog, in which I will feature a specific Human Rights-related link, article, blog post or other media item and discussion, encouraging others to get involved. Read my first post here.

Link(s) of the Day:

Stand Up Against Poverty 2010
Global Poverty Project
The End of Poverty?
Poverty and Hunger

Why I Chose These Links:

This week’s addition to the Worst Form of Violence series is mostly focused on taking action. Both Stand Up and the GPP are about ways that individual people can commit to reducing poverty, not necessarily through donations. Poverty and Hunger also has information about the different areas where poverty is prevalent, including poverty news, videos and multimedia. The End of Poverty? is an award-winning documentary on the subject which looks like a fantastic watch for those interested:

The End of Poverty? is a daring, thought-provoking and very timely documentary by award-winning filmmaker, Philippe Diaz, revealing that poverty is not an accident. It began with military conquest, slavery and colonization that resulted in the seizure of land, minerals and forced labor. Today, global poverty has reached new levels because of unfair debt, trade and tax policies — in other words, wealthy countries exploiting the weaknesses of poor, developing countries.

I’m hoping to get a copy of it to review before the end of the month. Let’s get active!

Thursdays in Black: The Worst Form of Violence (Part II)

Thursdays in Black official logo

Why Wear Black?

It’s perfectly simple: for one day a week, wear black to show your support for survivors of discrimination and violence, and to work together for a world without brutality. In addition, I have decided to add a weekly feature to this blog, in which I will feature a specific Human Rights-related link, article, blog post or other media item and discussion, encouraging others to get involved. Read my first post here.

Link(s) of the Day:

Child Poverty Action Group
OxFam(NZ)
Save the Children
Starved for Attention

Why I Chose These Links:

Continuing last week’s theme, I’ve been digging up sites on Poverty to go with the Social Justice Challenge topic of the month. This week I chose to feature mostly Children’s Poverty. CPAG addresses children in need in my home country, while Oxfam is a more general charity, and Save the Children addresses children’s needs in the US and all over the world, as does the Starved for Attention campaign. Together, these sites are making a difference. From Save the Children:

Our mission is to create lasting, positive change in the lives of children in need in the U.S. and around the world.

Our priorities are to ensure that children in need grow up protected and safe, educated, healthy and well-nourished, and  able to thrive in economically secure households.

A collection of necessary links for anyone interested in stemming the tide of poverty.

Thursdays in Black: The Worst Form of Violence

Thursdays in Black official logo

Why Wear Black?

It’s perfectly simple: for one day a week, wear black to show your support for survivors of discrimination and violence, and to work together for a world without brutality. In addition, I have decided to add a weekly feature to this blog, in which I will feature a specific Human Rights-related link, article, blog post or other media item and discussion, encouraging others to get involved. Read my first post here.

Link(s) of the Day:

Poverty.com
World Bank: Poverty
Global Issues: Causes of Poverty
GCAP

Why I Chose these Links:

GCAP official logo (C) GCAPThis month’s Social Justice Challenge theme is poverty, and since the hosts for the challenge seem to be AWOL at the moment, I thought I’d devote a couple of my July posts to links related to the topic. Poverty.com is a practical approach to poverty – it is a private website that gives information about what poverty means, the problems it creates, and the ways these can be addressed. The World Bank site gives more reliable facts and figures, while Global Issues looks at the causes of poverty the world over. And, finally, Global Campaign to Action Against Poverty (aka GCAP or the White Band campaign) is the world’s largest coalition against poverty and inequality. In their own words:

The Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP) is a growing alliance that brings together trade unions, INGOs, the women’s and youth movements, community and faith groups and others to call for action from world leaders in the global North and South to meet their promises to end poverty and inequality.

[…]

We, the GCAP movement, will not rest until we defeat the underlying and structural causes that impoverish and exclude large sections of the population, including women, indigenous peoples, minorities, children, youth, persons with different abilities, people of different sexual orientations, workers, dalits and displaced persons, amongst others.

It’s the best of the above links and the one that, I think, will make the most difference, so I would definitely suggest checking it out and finding out what you can do to help!

Thursdays in Black: Refuge for Refugees

Thursdays in Black official logo

Why Wear Black?

It’s perfectly simple: for one day a week, wear black to show your support for survivors of discrimination and violence, and to work together for a world without brutality. In addition, I have decided to add a weekly feature to this blog, in which I will feature a specific Human Rights-related link, article, blog post or other media item and discussion, encouraging others to get involved. Read my first post here.

Link of the Day:

UNHCR – The UN Refugee Agency

Why I Chose this Link:

Hard as it may be to believe for those of us living in relative safety, a staggering number of people do not have the luxury of stability in their environment. Some 43.3 million people have been forcibly displaced from their homes by violence or persecution, with almost 1 million new asylum seekers in the past year alone. The UN Refugee Agency was founded in 1950 by the United Nations to help protect and potentially repatriate those forced out of their homes. In their own words:

The agency is mandated to lead and co-ordinate international action to protect refugees and resolve refugee problems worldwide. Its primary purpose is to safeguard the rights and well-being of refugees. It strives to ensure that everyone can exercise the right to seek asylum and find safe refuge in another State, with the option to return home voluntarily, integrate locally or to resettle in a third country.

In more than five decades, the agency has helped people restart their lives.

An important and sadly necessary Agency, whose work should be supported.

Thursdays in Black: Watch the Watchmen

Thursdays in Black official logo

Why Wear Black?

It’s perfectly simple: for one day a week, wear black to show your support for survivors of discrimination and violence, and to work together for a world without brutality. In addition, I have decided to add a weekly feature to this blog, in which I will feature a specific Human Rights-related link, article, blog post or other media item and discussion, encouraging others to get involved. Read my first post here.

Link of the Day:

Human Rights Watch

Why I Chose this Link:

HRW Official Logo (C) Human Rights WatchMuch like Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch is an international organisation devoted to the protection of human rights and, in particular, the exposure and identification of human rights violations all over the world. Their mission is an important one, and unfortunately very necessary in today’s world. From their About page:

Human Rights Watch is one of the world’s leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. By focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes. Our rigorous, objective investigations and strategic, targeted advocacy build intense pressure for action and raise the cost of human rights abuse. For 30 years, Human Rights Watch has worked tenaciously to lay the legal and moral groundwork for deep-rooted change and has fought to bring greater justice and security to people around the world.

They also cover a wider range of rights than Amnesty International, ranging from LGBTQ issues to Women’s Rights to Migrants and People with Disabilities. A truly multi-faceted and wide-ranging organisation! If you have the time, I suggest you sign up for their newsletter updates. After all, as their motto states: staying informed is the first step towards creating change.

Thursdays in Black: Support the Sisterhood

Thursdays in Black official logo

Why Wear Black?

It’s perfectly simple: for one day a week, wear black to show your support for survivors of discrimination and violence, and to work together for a world without brutality. In addition, I have decided to add a weekly feature to this blog, in which I will feature a specific Human Rights-related link, article, blog post or other media item and discussion, encouraging others to get involved. Read my first post here.

Link of the Day:

Women For Women (International)

Why I Chose this Link:

Women For Women logoGiven that last month’s Social Justice Challenge theme didn’t really get off the ground, and we’re still waiting on June’s intro post, I thought I’d get a head start on this month’s theme and focus on a link about Genocide this week. Women For Women is a wonderful site that helps the female survivors of war to rebuild their lives and grow. It’s more or less based on an adult version of Girl Theory: that women are and can be a powerful force for change if given the opportunity, and it’s our responsibility to ensure they receive it. From their About page:

Participation in our one-year program launches women on a journey from victim to survivor to active citizen. We identify services to support graduates of the program as they continue to strive for greater social, economic and political participation in their communities.

As each woman engages in a multi-phase process of recovery and rehabilitation, she opens a window of opportunity presented by the end of conflict to help improve the rights, freedoms and status of women in her country. As women who go through our program assume leadership positions in their villages, actively participate in the reconstruction of their communities, build civil society, start businesses, train other women and serve as role models, they become active citizens who can help to establish lasting peace and stability.

I consider myself a feminist – I believe all human beings deserve the chance to live safe, happy lives, no matter who they are or what sex they are born. This, I think, is a step in the right direction, and it’s wonderful to see.