Archive for the ‘ Hunger ’ Category

Thursdays in Black: The Worst Form of Violence (Part IV)

Thursdays in Black official logo

Why Wear Black?

It’s perfectly simple: for one day a week, wear black to show your support for survivors of discrimination and violence, and to work together for a world without brutality. In addition, I have decided to add a weekly feature to this blog, in which I will feature a specific Human Rights-related link, article, blog post or other media item and discussion, encouraging others to get involved. Read my first post here.

Link(s) of the Day:

Stand Up Against Poverty 2010
Global Poverty Project
The End of Poverty?
Poverty and Hunger

Why I Chose These Links:

This week’s addition to the Worst Form of Violence series is mostly focused on taking action. Both Stand Up and the GPP are about ways that individual people can commit to reducing poverty, not necessarily through donations. Poverty and Hunger also has information about the different areas where poverty is prevalent, including poverty news, videos and multimedia. The End of Poverty? is an award-winning documentary on the subject which looks like a fantastic watch for those interested:

The End of Poverty? is a daring, thought-provoking and very timely documentary by award-winning filmmaker, Philippe Diaz, revealing that poverty is not an accident. It began with military conquest, slavery and colonization that resulted in the seizure of land, minerals and forced labor. Today, global poverty has reached new levels because of unfair debt, trade and tax policies — in other words, wealthy countries exploiting the weaknesses of poor, developing countries.

I’m hoping to get a copy of it to review before the end of the month. Let’s get active!

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Thursdays in Black: The Worst Form of Violence (Part II)

Thursdays in Black official logo

Why Wear Black?

It’s perfectly simple: for one day a week, wear black to show your support for survivors of discrimination and violence, and to work together for a world without brutality. In addition, I have decided to add a weekly feature to this blog, in which I will feature a specific Human Rights-related link, article, blog post or other media item and discussion, encouraging others to get involved. Read my first post here.

Link(s) of the Day:

Child Poverty Action Group
OxFam(NZ)
Save the Children
Starved for Attention

Why I Chose These Links:

Continuing last week’s theme, I’ve been digging up sites on Poverty to go with the Social Justice Challenge topic of the month. This week I chose to feature mostly Children’s Poverty. CPAG addresses children in need in my home country, while Oxfam is a more general charity, and Save the Children addresses children’s needs in the US and all over the world, as does the Starved for Attention campaign. Together, these sites are making a difference. From Save the Children:

Our mission is to create lasting, positive change in the lives of children in need in the U.S. and around the world.

Our priorities are to ensure that children in need grow up protected and safe, educated, healthy and well-nourished, and  able to thrive in economically secure households.

A collection of necessary links for anyone interested in stemming the tide of poverty.

Thursdays in Black: Support the Sisterhood

Thursdays in Black official logo

Why Wear Black?

It’s perfectly simple: for one day a week, wear black to show your support for survivors of discrimination and violence, and to work together for a world without brutality. In addition, I have decided to add a weekly feature to this blog, in which I will feature a specific Human Rights-related link, article, blog post or other media item and discussion, encouraging others to get involved. Read my first post here.

Link of the Day:

Women For Women (International)

Why I Chose this Link:

Women For Women logoGiven that last month’s Social Justice Challenge theme didn’t really get off the ground, and we’re still waiting on June’s intro post, I thought I’d get a head start on this month’s theme and focus on a link about Genocide this week. Women For Women is a wonderful site that helps the female survivors of war to rebuild their lives and grow. It’s more or less based on an adult version of Girl Theory: that women are and can be a powerful force for change if given the opportunity, and it’s our responsibility to ensure they receive it. From their About page:

Participation in our one-year program launches women on a journey from victim to survivor to active citizen. We identify services to support graduates of the program as they continue to strive for greater social, economic and political participation in their communities.

As each woman engages in a multi-phase process of recovery and rehabilitation, she opens a window of opportunity presented by the end of conflict to help improve the rights, freedoms and status of women in her country. As women who go through our program assume leadership positions in their villages, actively participate in the reconstruction of their communities, build civil society, start businesses, train other women and serve as role models, they become active citizens who can help to establish lasting peace and stability.

I consider myself a feminist – I believe all human beings deserve the chance to live safe, happy lives, no matter who they are or what sex they are born. This, I think, is a step in the right direction, and it’s wonderful to see.

Thursdays in Black: Learn as You Combat Hunger and Poverty

Thursdays in Black official logo

**NEW! Thursdays in Black has been changed to a weekly feature instead of fortnightly. Watch this space!**

Why Wear Black?

It’s perfectly simple: for one day a week, wear black to show your support for survivors of discrimination and violence, and to work together for a world without brutality. In addition, I have decided to add a weekly feature to this blog, in which I will feature a specific Human Rights-related link, article, blog post or other media item and discussion, encouraging others to get involved. Read my first post here.

Link of the Day:

FreeRice.com

Why I Chose this Link:

If you haven’t heard of FreeRice.com already, you should have! It’s a fun website run by the UN World Food programme. It’s really quite a simple concept, which is what makes it so brilliant: you play the language game (or another subject – your choice) and for every question you answer correctly, they donate 10 grains of rice to a needy family.

10 grains of rice doesn’t seem like much, but it’s important to remember that at any given time, there are a number of individuals playing at the same time as you. As the website states: “It’s everyone together that makes the difference.”

You can choose from famous paintings, maths, chemistry, English, geography or one of four languages to answer questions about. You can also compete with a friend to see who can get to the highest level and/or donate the most rice – all you need is two internet-capable computers. There are plenty of ways you can use it to enhance your knowledge, while at the same time contributing much-needed food to those who can most use it.

FreeRice is a website committed to the cause of ending hunger around the world. It is run entirely for free and at no profit. All money (100%) raised by the site goes to the UN World Food Programme to help feed the hungry. […]

The UN World Food Programme works around the globe and FreeRice donations are made with no restrictions. This freedom of use allows them to apply the donations to countries that need it most, often those that don’t make the headlines in the news, yet where chronic hunger continues unchecked.

Often World Food Programme is able to purchase the rice in the very countries where the beneficiaries are located, cutting down on the transport time to reach the hungry and helping to stimulate local economies at the same time.

Why not take a few minutes out of your day to enhance your skills and help others at the same time? Seems like a win-win situation to me!

Social Justice Challenge: ACTION! for Hunger

For this month’s activist-level Social Justice challenge, I have:

  1. Added a SocialVibe widget to my sidebar promoting a charity dedicated to eradicating hunger and poverty.
  2. Begun the novel Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimimanda Ngozi Adichie (to be completed).
  3. Learned about Kwashiokor from this video.
  4. Donated several hundred grains of rice through FreeRice.com.

What have you been doing?

Social Justice Challenge, Month 4: Hunger

While I am still completing last month’s novel, I thought I would go ahead and post the image for this month’s Social Justice Challenge on Hunger.

What do I think of when I hear the world “hunger”?

theviewspaper.net

I think of World Vision advertisements. I think of children with sticks for limbs. I think of those people in Buddhist tradition said to be reincarnated as hungry ghosts (peta) with huge, distended bellies and tiny, insatiable mouths.

You may notice I have added a SocialVibe widget to the site. It says I “support” hunger and poverty (something of a poor choice of words) but what it really is is a means of donating food and money to those in need. I’d really appreciate it if you could take the time to do an activity or two.